Environment, Brain, and Behavior (EBB) Lab

The Environment, Brain, and Behavior (EBB) Lab for Developmental Visual-Spatial and Learning Disorders is located in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Directed by Dr. Amy Margolis, the EBB lab studies the neurobiology of Non-Verbal Learning Disorder and how exposure to neurotoxic chemicals may affect neurodevelopment and manifest as learning and social problems. The EBB Lab uses neuroimaging to identify biomarkers of exposure to neurotoxicants and aid in the development of prevention and intervention programs to improve children's health outcomes.  

Recently Published Work

NVLD

NVLD and Developmental Visual-Spatial Disorder in Children: Clinical Guide to Assessment and Treatment [link]

  • The book provides comprehensive overview of assessing and treating children with NVLD or DVSD.

  • Offers a model for understanding NVLD subtypes and addresses the need for psychologically minded treatment

  • Examines NVLD therapy and tutoring priorities

  • Details specific intervention guidelines for treating NVLD

  • Describes how to conduct the intake process and create a treatment plan and team for working with NVLD patients

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Environment

Associations between Amygdala-Prefrontal Functional Connectivity and Age Depend on Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status [link]

  • Early life stress has been shown to accelerate the development of brain connectivity involved in emotion regulation, but less is known about the effects of socioeconomic disadvantage

  • Here we show that socioeconomic disadvantage is also associated with accelerated brain development and is related to anxiety symptoms

  • Interestingly, this was only evident when examining neighborhood but not household socioeconomic status

Ramphal B, DeSerisy M, Pagliaccio D, Raffanello E, Rauh V, Tau G, Posner J, Marsh R, Margolis AE. (2020). Associations between Amygdala-Prefrontal Functional Connectivity and Age Depend on Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Cerebral Cortex Communications, 1.